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Bubbe Wisdom by LouiseSilk
Unraveling the Threads of Life
Oct 19, 2010 | 85855 views | 0 0 comments | 35 35 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

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Bad News For Us Fast Food Vegetarians
by LouiseSilk
Jul 17, 2014 | 298 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

I just learned that my favorite fast food: The Boca Burger is not healthy! How could that be? Because Boca Burgers are made from soybeans bathed in a product called hexane. Hexane extracts the oil from soybeans, a necessary step to making most conventional soy ingredients. Unfortunately, hexane, a byproduct of gasoline refining, is also a neurotoxin and an air pollutant.

The Cornucopia Institute has developed a Guide to Choosing Non-Hexane Meat Alternatives and the Guide to Choosing Non-Hexane Nutrition Bars to help us support the companies that have committed to hexane-free soy ingredients.

Like any food, there are good and bad choices. It’s time to start making my own!

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A Writer’s Wisdom
by LouiseSilk
Jul 15, 2014 | 118 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

The process of writing fiction is totally unconscious. It comes from what you are learning, as you live, from within. For me, all writing is a process of discovery. We are looking for the meaning of life. No matter where you are, there are conflicts and dramas everywhere. It is the process of what it means to be a human being; how you react and are reacted upon, these inward and outer pressures. If you are writing with a direct cause in mind, you are writing propaganda. It's fatal for a fiction writer. Nadine Gordimer

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One Of A Kind
by LouiseSilk
Jul 10, 2014 | 188 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

(JTA) — Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, the father of the Jewish Renewal movement, has died at age 89.

A maverick rabbi from an Orthodox background who spent time in the Chabad-Lubavitch movement, Schachter-Shalomi transitioned over time toward a New Age, neo-Hasidic approach, gaining a substantial following on his own but also influencing other Jewish denominations.

His nontraditional approaches to Jewish spirituality, including services marked by ecstatic prayer, drumming and dancing, eventually morphed into the Jewish Renewal movement.

Known to friends and followers as Reb Zalman, he lived out his later years in Boulder, Colo., where he died Thursday morning after being ill for some time. An associate told JTA that he had been battling a pneumonia infection in recent weeks.

The movement he started had its origins in the 1960s, when Schachter-Shalomi began instituting meditation and dance during prayer services. He sought to fuse the mystical traditions learned while he was Lubavitch with the sensibilities of the modern world in an effort to revitalize a synagogue practice he found stultifying.

He eventually broke with Chabad, founding the P’nai Or Religious Fellowship in 1962 and a havurah — a lay-led congregation with no central leader — in Somerville, Mass., in 1968. He ordained the first Renewal rabbi, Daniel Siegel, in 1974.

Schachter-Shalomi led prayers in English set to popular tunes, translated Hasidic texts on mysticism into English, promoted ecologically friendly kashrut and encouraged Jews to create their own colorful tallitot, or prayer shawls.

In 1993, P’nai Or merged with Rabbi Arthur Waskow’s Shalom Center to become Aleph, the Alliance for Jewish Renewal. The Philadelphia-based institution has ordained some 80 rabbis.

Born in Poland in 1924 and raised in Vienna, Schachter-Shalomi’s family fled the Nazis and eventually landed in Brooklyn in 1941. He was ordained as a rabbi in 1947 from the Central Lubavitch Yeshiva. He later got a master’s degree from Boston University in the psychology of religion and a doctorate from Hebrew Union College, which is affiliated with the Reform movement.

His last teaching post was at Naropa University, a Buddhist-inspired Colorado institution.

“This man is a Hasid,” Rebecca Alpert, a professor of religion at Temple Universty, told JTA several years ago in an interview about Schachter-Shalomi’s influence. “No one could possibly duplicate his sagacity, presence and magic.”

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Hoarding
by LouiseSilk
Jul 08, 2014 | 301 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

Hoarding: the acquisition of, and failure to discard, possessions which appear to be useless or of limited value. Frost and Gross 1993

I was catching up with an old fiber friend recently and told her about my success making memory quilts. She suggested I might have a market working with hoarders.

Her idea brought me to my own forms of hoarding because I’ve been spending my last stretch of studio time trying to get a handle on my materials. I started sorting in the effort to find a place to house the denim we will repurpose for SilkDenim- yes, another form of collecting, for sure, but a story for another time.

Quilters are known for being very attached to their fabric collections: The one who dies with the most fabric, wins! It’s crazy to realize that I have enough quilting fabric to make- I ‘m just guessing here- an easy couple hundred quilts with what’s on hand.

In the effort to streamline the collection, I removed all of the small precious scraps- anything less than a ¼ yd and am in process cutting them into usable strips that I will use to create Gee’s Bend type bed quilts for an upcoming exhibition.

I have always said one can never have too many quilts- but now I wonder-could I possible be a quilt hoarder too?

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Steve's Garden 2014
by LouiseSilk
Jul 02, 2014 | 394 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
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Buyer Beware
by LouiseSilk
Jul 01, 2014 | 295 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

I knew something was fishy the one (and only) time I walked into a Hobby Lobby. The sign in the window said something like: we close on Sunday so that our employees can rest. Since when does a retailer close on Sundays????

Inside there were other hints- framed pictures of Christian imagery; a book by the owners that showed them in front of a church (or maybe it was a cross) on the cover; lots of Christmas type decorations even though it wasn’t Christmas. They had a great selection of whatever it is we were after that day, but I knew I would never step foot in that store again. This is clearly a company with a point of view that is not my choice to support.

When I saw that Hobby Lobby had taken contraception to the Supreme Court, I wasn’t surprised. The ruling yesterday made me uneasy and scared but I took a little comfort reading this article.

In 2012, Hobby Lobby, operated by David and Barbara Green, contested the so-called "contraception mandate" in the Affordable Care Act. This part of the law initially required organizations of a certain size to cover FDA-approved contraceptives in their insurance plans. The Greens, along with a Mennonite family that owns a company called Conestoga Wood, said that four of the listed contraceptives violated their religious beliefs because they might possibly prevent a fertilized egg from implanting in a woman's uterus. Even if they weren't taking the drugs themselves, they said, they felt morally culpable for paying for their employees to take them.

The question was whether this was a legitimate claim under the 1993 Religious Freedom Restoration Act: Did the mandate "substantially" burden these companies' ability to practice their religion, and did the government have an alternative way to accomplish its goal of providing contraceptive access? For that matter, could companies even have religious-freedom rights? Does paying for contraceptives actually count as a substantial burden on someone's religious beliefs?

In 49 pages authored by Justice Samuel Alito speaking about religious liberty, followed by a 35-page dissent on the basis of a violation of women’s rights from Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Court said yes to all of the questions.

Good news is that this decision is limited. It doesn’t necessarily prevent women who work at Hobby Lobby, Conestoga Wood, or other religious companies from accessing birth control through their insurance plans. If the government uses the same exemption it has set up for non-profit organizations, employers cannot deny affordable birth-control access to their employees; they just don’t have to pay for it. Maybe it’s not so bad to work at Joanne’s or Michael’s after all?

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Be Impeccable
by LouiseSilk
Jun 26, 2014 | 276 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

Impeccability begins with a single act that has to be deliberate, precise and sustained. If that act is repeated long enough, one acquires a sense of unbending intent which can be applied to anything else. If that is accomplished the road is clear. One thing will lead to another until the warrior realizes his full potential.

Carlos Castaneda

The Impeccable Warrior is a sacred being on a sacred journey in a conscious state of true acceptance that whole-heartedly respects and honors all. There is no win, no lose, no accomplish, only true intentions free of arrogance and humility formed into timeless and flawless oneness with nothing outside or beside, against or for.

Performing each action to the best ability fully engaged in the moment living on the edge at all times, not thinking about the action, not thinking about the results of the action, the warrior has no regrets, suffers no remorse, no missed opportunities, no lost moments of pleasure.

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Who, What, Why Alexander?
by LouiseSilk
Jun 24, 2014 | 260 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

Frederick Matthias Alexander (1869-1955) was a Shakespearean actor with chronically voice problems that challenged his career. When doctors found nothing wrong, he went through years of rigorous self-observation developing a technique, exploring the relationship of habit, thought and perception to human movement and functioning.

The basic concept of the technique is to recognize our bad habits that have come to feel, see, act as normal, take advantage of the space between stimulus and action, and choose a new action to make active productive change in the primary relationship among the head, neck and back.

The Alexander Technique teaches sitting upright without strain; preventing spinal compression and muscular tension in the neck, shoulders and upper back; improved range of motion in the joints; reduced pressure on the wrist; more awareness of body's signals and signs of distress to relieve tension before it escalates to pain; to proper breathing to prevent fatigue and calm the nervous system restoring balance to the body.

I met my Alexander teacher at Our Clubhouse.

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Having An Open Heart
by LouiseSilk
Jun 18, 2014 | 238 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

Having an “open heart” does not mean being “happy.” It does not mean being spiritual or wise or anything at all. It means to have an open attitude toward ourselves.

It is easy to confuse spiritual openness with the personal sensation of the emotion of love, in and around the heart. We are not looking for something so pretty! We want action, and the action we want is love-in-action, the extending of the hand of friendship toward our own being. It means not repeating our historical attitudes toward our own faults. It means giving ourselves a second chance, over and over again. It means seeing our true limitations and imperfections, and accepting them with kindness instead of war.

This morning, bow down to yourself. It is not a selfish or egotistical thing to do-you are bowing down to your real self, with all its whole and broken pieces.

Jason Shulman: The Instruction Manual For Receiving God: Page 52

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Things Like This Give Me Hope
by LouiseSilk
Jun 17, 2014 | 242 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
Once Useless Tomato Skins
Once Useless Tomato Skins
slideshow

“Although we are in the very early stages of research, and many questions remain, we are excited about the possibilities this could produce for both Heinz and Ford, and the advancement of sustainable 100% plant-based plastics,”

Heinz Associate Director of Packaging.

Ford and Heinz are collaborating on the use of the more than two million tons of tomato peels, stems and seeds leftover from Heinz’s annual production of ketchup to create sustainable, composite materials for vehicles.

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